Education-focused approach to fan and player behavior at Vermont high school games this year

0

Vermont school districts, in coordination with the Vermont Principals’ Association, want to make sure that rowdy — and even racist — behavior at high school games doesn’t happen as frequently as in previous years. Several incidents last season raised this concern. Enosburg Falls players and fans allegedly made racist comments at the Winooski boys’ soccer team during a game. South Burlington volleyball players have been accused of ‘racial and transphoic slurs’ during a game with Burlington. The Hartford High School women’s soccer team walked off the field during a game against Fair Haven after claiming sexual harassment comments were coming from the opposing stands. “The Vermont Principals’ Association takes behavior at games and activities very seriously,” said Jay Nichols, executive director of the VPA. “Every athletic director and administrator has the power to stop a game and remove any spectator at any time who does not behave appropriately. Schools may also ban spectators from school property if fans cannot not behave in a respectful manner.” The VPA requires schools to read a pre-game statement before the start of each event. He explains the consequences of inappropriate behavior, including ejection, game over, forfeit, ejection of all fans, and rescheduling of future games. There is also a new reporting form for anyone who witnesses this behavior during a game. The VPA said this would help them track incidents and identify patterns. They said people should also report any situation to their school administration. Mount Mansfield Union High School has put up signs with the VPA pre-game statement at all of their athletic facilities. They don’t have a public announcement system, so it’s an accessible way for them to spread the statement to everyone who attends or participates in the game. “I would like to say that has never happened here, but like in any setting, of course it happened,” said David Marlow, director of student activities at MMU. “They’re high school kids, I think the education-based piece of athletics that we’re trying to portray here with our student-athletes and the lessons learned and taught are important and they also need to be embraced by those who come to watch the game. event.” More recommendations and resources for districts, players and fans can be found on the VPA website.

Vermont school districts, in coordination with the Vermont Principals’ Association, want to make sure that rowdy — and even racist — behavior at high school games doesn’t happen as frequently as in previous years.

Several incidents last season raised this concern.

Enosburg Falls players and fans allegedly made racist comments at the Winooski boys’ soccer team during a game. South Burlington volleyball players have been accused of ‘racial and transphoic slurs’ during a game with Burlington. The Hartford High School women’s soccer team walked off the field during a game against Fair Haven after claiming sexual harassment comments were coming from the opposing stands.

“The Vermont Principals’ Association takes behavior at games and activities very seriously,” said Jay Nichols, executive director of the VPA. “Every athletic director and administrator has the power to stop a game and eject at any time any spectator who does not behave appropriately. Schools may also deny spectators access to school property if fans can’t behave respectfully.”

The VPA asks schools to Lily a pre-match statement before the start of each event. He explains the consequences of inappropriate behavior, including ejection, game over, forfeit, ejection of all fans, and rescheduling of future games.

There is also a new report form for anyone who witnesses this behavior during a game. The VPA said this would help them track incidents and identify patterns. They said people should also report any situations to their school administration.

Mount Mansfield Union High School has put up signs with the VPA pre-game statement at all of its athletic facilities. They don’t have a public announcement system, so it’s an accessible way for them to spread the statement to everyone who attends or participates in the game.

“I would like to say that has never happened here, but like in any setting, of course it has happened,” said David Marlow, director of student activities at MMU. “They’re high school kids, I think the education-based piece of athletics that we’re trying to portray here with our student-athletes and the lessons learned and taught are important and they also need to be embraced by those who come to watch the game. ‘event. “

More recommendations and resources for districts, players and fans can be found on the VPA website.

Share.

Comments are closed.